Thursday, July 23, 2020

CP5 MindMapping and Task Management with MeisterLabs - Podcast with Michael Hollauf

CP5 MindMapping and Task Management with MeisterLabs - Podcast with Michael Hollauf BUSINESS MODEL OF MINDMEISTERMartin: Great. Michael, let’s talk about the business model. So, when you first launched the model, it was something like as you said a free model but later on you added a freemium model. Can you elaborate a little bit on that? So how did this evolve and how did it work?Michael: Actually, we did have â€" right from the launch; we had a freemium model. The only things we didn’t have were premium features. Yes, we had the pricing plan as well as the whole billing system so you could use a credit card and everything, but we didn’t really have features that were available to the freemium version. The funny thing was though that from Day 1 â€" and I think actually on Day 2, the first person paid, you know, a huge amount, I don’t know the cost back then, I think 30-40€, but they paid because they liked the product without having any need to pay. So that was pretty interesting. I mean, obviously the real payments in higher numbers only came when they a ctually had premium features and when we started to put up some restrictions on the free usage, they have to do otherwise, you won’t be able to sustain your business.Martin: And how did you try to balance growing the customer base which is, from I understand, you’re mainly driven by signing up free users and secondly, balancing this with developing, let’s say, premium features so you can monetize them because you are only having limited resources? How did you try to balance those two things?Michael: Another very good question. It’s at a point where we always have this question about it and still do it actually. But for a long time, actually still up to now, we went more for the giving away free as much as you can to increase virality to get in front of as many people as possible who if they don’t pay, might at least invite other people, you know, that might help you grow virally and try to make the features so that people who that are actually using it, not only profession als but definitely the ones who use it professionally and for business purposes but also who use it really more deeply, that they will pay. You let special users in it for free because in the end of the day, they are unlikely to pay for it anyway if I’m honest, and the ones who use it really deeply; you try to convert by adding features, that they would need, into the premium plan.Martin: How did I come to it, think about MindMeister before I was doing some memory training and I was thinking about: “Okay, what type of cool business application could I start? And then I came to MindMeister and it looked very, very simple and easy to me. So now, the question is: What are the reasons you keep out competitors out of the way? What is the secret sauce? Is it the scale, is it the simplicity, is it just because you’re somehow market leader in this kind of segment already?Michael: I think all of it placed together a little bit. We were the first to launch but not by a lot. Actually, I think about two months after we launched, the first competitor came along with you know, quite a similar solution, he was technically different, it was actually flash-phase back then, the competitor. It was the same browser-based mind-mapping.Yes, the thing is that definitely something we always prowess one of our USPs is simplicity â€" the focus on usability, on simplicity, on a beautiful design that we try and update regularly and keep fresh and keep modern, also again try and focus on a simple user interface that doesn’t overload the user, that keeps the learning curve quick and steep and that’s what we still do with that product with all the other products as well. At least I believe it’s one of the keys to success for all kinds of apps.Martin: And when this competitor arose like two months after you’ve launched, what had been your thought or reactions to that?Michael: Desperation, initially. In the first few years, whenever a new competitor came along, we would be quite depressed and think: “Oh god, what if they do it so much better than we do?”, “What if, they take our market away?” It hasn’t happened fortunately. If you stay on the ball, if you keep pleasing the users, keep making your app better, keep providing it with service, it’s unlikely to happen, unless Facebook or whoever decided to enter your niche. It hasn’t happened and we learned to live with it much better. So these days when we see a new app, we’re like: “Right, okay, so yup, looks good but we’ve come a long way and I think they will have to come a long way as well.Martin: Can you elaborate a little bit on the current team set-up and what is actually your focus? Are you seeing yourself more like a, let’s say, marketing customer acquisition company or are you perceiving yourself more as a tech company or maybe something totally different?Michael: I think we would like to perceive ourselves as a marketing growth customer acquisition company but if we’re being honest, we’re a tech company. That’s not a bad thing in itself either. My co-founder, Till and I were both techies from our background, we’re still techies at heart, I think. Although in the last years we focused much, much more on things like marketing, growth and even finance â€" all these things, you have to obviously do if you run a company. So we do that much, much more with built teams there to do that, but in the end of the day, after everything, I think it’s the product that counts. You have to have a great product, you have to provide a great service, you can increase your success obviously with marketing but I think no amount of amazing marketing could turn a dot into a gold nugget.Martin: And how many free users that you need to acquire so you c ould become cash flow-neutral at least after many months?Michael: I think as we had about a hundred thousand users or something in free users in total that, I think, that that wasn’t breakeven yet. But I think it was bet ween a hundred thousand and three hundred thousand, somewhere there we had a monthly recurring revenue that helped us pay the costs, running costs of the company. Well, we were only free people back then, still it wasn’t a huge running cost. But like I said, we focused a lot on getting many users so the conversion rate wasn’t amazing to paid users so we needed quite a lot of free users to actually pay the costs, but it grew quite quickly.Martin: Good. And at what point of time did you think about adding another product and creating, let’s say, an overall brand like MeisterLabs?Michael: Early on, about three years ago I would say. So we launched it nine months ago, we took our time building the second product; we wanted to make it really good. It took about two years actually. But we saw a few things:First of all we saw: mind-mapping is a stage in a process and it’s usually the first stage in a project. Three years heavily in the start phase of a project, when you exchange id eas, when you brainstorm, when you map out your project, and then comes a point when you go into implementing the project and working on everything. Then you need a different tool, and we saw a lot of users dropping off, of MindMeister maybe coming back a couple of months later for the next project but actually dropping off. We said, “Okay, let’s, you know, it’s a shame that they have to move to another tool because we don’t provide anything for them.”So we thought: “Okay, that would be a nice point to offer them a product that’s integrated with MindMeister and supports them in that second phase of the project.” We thought there’s lots of task mission tools around, of course it’s a huge market, it’s a very important market and we thought we have a lot of ideas that could make it nice, make it very usable, very simple, combine some of the things we like in other tools and create something we hope users will like.Martin: Why did it take you two years to develop t his prototype? And second question would be, lots of start-ups have the belief that: “Let’s ship it early, get the customer feedback and then iterate on the live product” which apparently you did not do.Michael: Exactly, yes. I have to say, looking back I’m very happy with the result, it is one thing. We took our time, we took a long time, we went through many iterations of design and so on and when we shipped, it was a really, really good product. But, looking back, I think we should have probably come the other way, we should have done it quicker, come up with something quicker, got feedback faster. That’s what we’ll probably try to do working in the next product. That is a lesson learned, I would say. Although again, I couldn’t say if the result would be the same. You know, looking back now you don’t know what would’ve happened if you went the other way. Taking too long with a product has a lot of drawbacks apart from the fact that you know, we came up later, we did. You know, you have to keep your team motivated and developers as well, if you take too long to bring out something, obviously the market moves. So my take away from that experience was next time spend more time on a smaller initial prototype and try to ship it faster.Martin: When you started with the company, you had a very limited scope of what you wanted to achieve, like for example with MindMeister, and then adding further products. For me, the question is what is the bigger vision which combines those different product ideas?Michael: Well, the bigger vision is to cover the entire creative process inside a high-tech company, so to speak, because that’s our target market, our main target market. The creative process, I mean creative project that starts out with a brainstorming bit, product development bit, and some sort of marketing campaign bit, anything else. Right now we cover the first two phases, the brainstorming phase and the actual project carrying out. There is a missing piece at the end, there we have some ideas for that as it is one missing piece in there and we might come out with it with a product that covers something there and closes the circle to the next project.Martin: How are those products integrated? So, for example I look at MindMeister, how is it then integrated to MeisterTask?Michael: When you’re in MindMeister, you can switch on MeisterTask toolbar and you can connect each mind-map with a project, so to speak. And if it’s not connected you can just right from there, create a project for this mind-map, although I’ve made a mind-map that’s connected with the same project and all that. So, let’s say kind of a one-to-many relationship there. And then in the toolbar you’ll see all the people that are in your project. You see little avatars from photos of them, and you can very easily just drag any mind-map node, any topic onto one of those avatars and what it’ll do, it’ll create a task for that person in the projec t.We, for example, we a lot our weekly meetings, and in weekly meetings we mind-map all the things we go through and then, with that okay, so that’s actually that’s something that, you know, Andrei has to do. So, we make the task and we drag it onto his face and he has the task assigned and the project management system and he can start working on it after the meeting.Martin: What’s the idea of MeisterTask based on several customer requests or was it more of a vision of you both that you said: “Oh, it would be very interesting if we are working on this creative process and therefore the next logical step would be this although customers didn’t request it.”?Michael: We had many customer requests to enhance the task management functionality in MindMeister. In fact, there’s a little bit of a task management functionality there like all mind-mapping tools, they allow you to sign a priority onto a node and the person and due date. But it’s very, very lightweight, so it ha s no follow-through, no process behind it. It is also very little, in terms of task functionality.Customers wanted more there. So it was visible customers used it for task management as well but we didn’t want to blow up a, sort of, partial functionality of a mind-mapping tool and then make it into a mind-mapping tool more complex, more low fit. We thought: Okay, since this is something different what people do, then this should be done in a dedicated tool.Martin: One option would have been if Im having this kind of modular market where I’m having mind-maps and I perceive you as a clear market leader in that. And now you’re entering into another market which is more task related etc. So, did you receive some kind of reaction from the other task-related companies that were just adding mind-mapping functionality, and then the competitions in those two markets are even increasing?Michael: We haven’t seen that yet as such. I think it terms of market size the mind-mapping market is a very focused but still very niche market. Usually when companies are in a market of a certain size, they expand into bigger, adjacent markets. They usually don’t expand so much into smaller adjacent markets. So we haven’t seen many task management tools expanding into mind-mapping. We see quite a few of our mind-mapping competitors adding task management but they usually do it differently, they add some more functionality into their product.ADVICE TO ENTREPRENEURS FROM MICHAEL HOLLAUFMartin: So Michael, over the last let’s say ten to thirteen years, what have been the major learnings that you can share with other people starting a company? Like some the stupid mistakes an entrepreneur can do, or maybe some very cool things he should do?Michael: Well, that could potentially be quite long. People interested in the story, there’s this article on TechCrunch that kind of tells our story, in quite details.Whenever I talk about the learnings from 7, 8, 9 years ago, I always me ntion the fact that this was 7, 8, 9 years ago and that also the market, the internet market, SaaS market has moved a lot since then. So, when I talk about the way we launched with a private beta, had invited people, gave them invitations, that’s something that worked back then. Quite uncertain whether it would work as well now because many people have done it and the market has changed and you need to shout much louder these days to get their attention than you used to so many years ago.But I think some of the other learnings are still quite valid for example: the other one I mentioned is focus on making your product usable, focus on the user, try to give him a nice feeling when he uses it. That is one key to success that we’d had, modest as it may be compared to some other companies out there of course. But I still believe that that’s one of the big things and we are not ready to compromise on usability doing anything. So we will discuss any small user interface change in th e name UI for a very long time to make sure that it doesn’t make things more complex or scare users off. So that is something we are good at.Some of the things that we’ve learnt over the years that we weren’t so good at, we also learned that they were important, have to do with obviously with marketing, with analytics especially. So analytics is one of the things that everyone knows is hugely important. In terms of measure, how your tool is used, measure what your users do, measure the conversions, all your key metrics, beware of key metrics. But I think at the same time, everyone who knows how important it is, very few actually know the numbers very well or do enough on that side. And that’s something that becomes more difficult to do the more you grow. So, if you start up with a small tool, and you build all the analytics and your measurements right in the beginning that’s much easier than if you do it years later when you have quite a large tool.Martin: You said that an alytics is very important. In the beginning, you didn’t know how your valid proposition and business model will look like because you’re iterating, etc. Do you think it’s a very good idea to have analytics from day one although you do not know what it is because it costs money to set up analytics, analyze etc, etc? Or do you think even though you should be very agile and iterative, still analytics should be done on day one?Michael: Yes, I think it should be. Like I said, it’s very easy to build it into a small product and I don’t think there’s any real cost associated with it if you don’t have a lot of traffic yet. Most of the tools that are out there will let you use it for free up to I don’t know how many thousands of impressions per day or logs per day. Once you grow, it’ll cost money but then you could hopefully afford it. It just helps you know your business, it helps you to keep things simple because if you measure everything you will also not run the risk of building too complex work flows into your tool, billing flows, conversion flows, and sign-up flows because it’s hard to measure them.The other thing we’ve learned, we’ve had quite a difficult set-up of ­ ­in terms of 30-day-free-trial with or without the credit card. And we actually went back and made everything much, much simpler. First of all, it is better for the user, easier to understand for the user, and second, because it’s much easier to measure.Martin: What tools can you recommend for analytics?Michael: So, we are using a mixture at the moment. One of the tools is everyone talks about is quite good, really, it’s Amplitude as it lets you log real, granular user events inside your app and see what users do, look at funnels about what they’re doing in the app. We still use Google Analytics for main SEO things.There is a couple of other SEO tools, on-page optimization tools and so on that are out there but there’s really too many to make any clear recommendation . We use on-page, we use search metrics, we use a few of those but take your pick. Something is better in each of the tools but overall, as long as you use something, that’s good enough.Martin: And when you wake up in the morning, what are the 3 to 5 key metrics you are totally interested about in order to assess whether your business is running well or not?Michael: When I wake up in the morning I usually unfortunately think of the tech things. I should think about those key metrics more. But some of the things we’re deeply looking at are, with intention, something we’re looking into very much in MindMeister. So, we look at different things in different products. In MindMeister retention is our focus and that’s because, like I mentioned before, it’s a bit of a seasonal product â€" you use it when you start a project, and you map it out, you create a couple of mind maps, share them with friends. Then when you fund that, you go away maybe for a long time and maybe come back. So our goal with that tool is build it into the usual work lifes of people more like we use it on an on-going basis and there we focus on retention. We have a lot of new users and we have four to five thousand new users per day, still growing, it’s pretty amazing. It’s important to show the people what they can do with the tool and keep them as users.With MeisterTask, it’s different. MeisterTask is a much more techy product once you use it because once you had a project there, once you had a task in there, unless you manage to finish them all, you will continue to use it, you know, you can continue to make more tasks, continue to share it with people. There, for us it’s more important to show people this is here as well, so this is an alternative if you’re using, let’s say, Asana, Wunderlist, or Trello, have a look at this because we think it’s better for these and these reasons. Most of the people who’ve seen it have agreed and the challenge there is how to get in front of those people.Martin: Great. Michael, what other learnings did you perceive over the years?Michael: So one other thing we’ve seen is it’s also been the way we’ve developed the second product, MeisterTask. If you had a problem and you don’t find a solution out there or you don’t find that you like and you then build a product to solve that problem for you then it’s quite likely, very likely so to speak, that there will be others out there, probably many others who had have that same problem and for whom you will help solve the problem with your product, so to speak. We did this with MeisterTask, we had this problem ourselves, how do we do our tasks after we’ve the mind-mapping. We built something that we wanted to use that helps us in our product development in our company, helps not only the tech team but also helps the marketing team and the sales team to manage their projects. So, we looked at companies our type, our size with different departments that would like to use an all-in-one tool together and built it for that. And we looked at the second characteristic as well there, we looked at companies â€" small companies like ours that work with freelancers, we have an external designer, we have an external iOS, Android developers and so on. And so we built the tools so that it also works for those people. You can write there, they have access to it, they don’t have to use only that and you can look at this use case and when we launched it had seemed that we weren’t the only ones who had that problem. So I think, build something for yourself that you really happy with and others will follow, so to speak.Martin: Great. Michael, thank you so much for sharing your insights and if you’re looking for a great task manager, check out MeisterTask. Thanks!Michael: Pleasure.THANKS FOR LISTENING! Welcome to the fifth episode of our podcast!You can download the podcast to your computer or listen to it here on the blog. Click here to subscribe in iTunes. Martin: Hi. This time we have a one â€" or long-time favourite of mine, who is Michael from MindMeister. I can remember when I was still at university, I thought to myself: “Hmm, maybe I should start mind-mapping a company myself.” When I saw Michael, I said: “Hmm, maybe I would look for another business modeller.” Hi Michael! Who are you and what do you do?Michael: Hi Martin! Thanks for having me. First off, I didn’t know you â€" almost became a competitor â€" but you know I’m glad you didn’t. So my name is Michael Hollauf. I’m an Austrian and I now run, together with my co-founder, Till Vollmer, I run a company called MeisterLabs and we have two products. One of it you mentioned, it’s MindMeister for online-based mind-mapping tools and the second one is MeisterTask, it’s a collaborative Canban-style task manager that is fully integrated with MindMeister and a few other tools as well. We just launched last year.Martin: Great. How did you start this company?Michae l: Actually, we’re coming up to the 10th anniversary of the company founding this February, so next month.Martin: Congrats.Michael: Thank you. The product MindMeister itself has been around for good eight â€" eight and a half years. We launched it about a year after we founded the company. We’ve got a story behind us out there.Martin: And what did you do in those, like, twelve or eighteen months before you launched MindMeister? Did you work on other ideas first and then iterate it? Or was the vision, “Yes, we like to do something like mind-mapping but maybe we’ll just work on the prototype maybe during our spare time and if we see some traction then we will switch to it full-time.”?Michael: Yes, it was a bit like that. All I can grew out of another company that we founded three years before. Till and I were at an outsourcing company. We had a team of Java and Rubin developers in Romania and we did projects for other companies. And when you have, sort of, a service company, you have a lot of work to do in the one side but you also have downtimes when you have fewer projects, you have, sort of, free time with the people. And we tried out a few ideas â€" different things like 3-4 ideas like I would say, small tools. One of them was an online browser-based mind-mapping visualization. That kind of really felt right so we developed it further and then I think we started to found the company that would be a product company, would be MeisterLabs. In the 12th month before the launch, we just developed a product for that.Martin: And what made you think: “Oh, maybe we are on the right track with Mind Meister back then”? So did you receive some great traction in terms of user acquisition? Because I still can remember the first time I saw you, you had something like 1,000 or 10,000 subscribers which wasn’t that much back then. But was it something like this type of market validation or was it some kind of radar customer feedback which made you think: “Yes . We’re on the right track.”?Michael: So, the first feeling we got that we were on the right track was just from us personally and showing it to our friends, trying it out with people inside the company. We all thought: “This works better than we thought; there could be a market for this”. And then after that, it was a private beta launch like you mentioned, in that private beta launch we got a lot of feedback really quickly. So we started with an invitation of about 200 people and I think within a couple of days, we had a thousand people there. So those 200 people invited had invited other people and it quickly became a thousand and then, actually, within two or three weeks, to ten thousand people. The fact that people invited others and sent the link around showed us, alright, this sure is something that some people at least have been waiting for.BUSINESS MODEL OF MINDMEISTERMartin: Great. Michael, let’s talk about the business model. So, when you first launched the mode l, it was something like as you said a free model but later on you added a freemium model. Can you elaborate a little bit on that? So how did this evolve and how did it work?Michael: Actually, we did have â€" right from the launch; we had a freemium model. The only things we didn’t have were premium features. Yes, we had the pricing plan as well as the whole billing system so you could use a credit card and everything, but we didn’t really have features that were available to the freemium version. The funny thing was though that from Day 1 â€" and I think actually on Day 2, the first person paid, you know, a huge amount, I don’t know the cost back then, I think 30-40€, but they paid because they liked the product without having any need to pay. So that was pretty interesting. I mean, obviously the real payments in higher numbers only came when they actually had premium features and when we started to put up some restrictions on the free usage, they have to do otherwise, you won’t be able to sustain your business.Martin: And how did you try to balance growing the customer base which is, from I understand, you’re mainly driven by signing up free users and secondly, balancing this with developing, let’s say, premium features so you can monetize them because you are only having limited resources? How did you try to balance those two things?Michael: Another very good question. It’s at a point where we always have this question about it and still do it actually. But for a long time, actually still up to now, we went more for the giving away free as much as you can to increase virality to get in front of as many people as possible who if they don’t pay, might at least invite other people, you know, that might help you grow virally and try to make the features so that people who that are actually using it, not only professionals but definitely the ones who use it professionally and for business purposes but also who use it really more deeply, that th ey will pay. You let special users in it for free because in the end of the day, they are unlikely to pay for it anyway if I’m honest, and the ones who use it really deeply; you try to convert by adding features, that they would need, into the premium plan.Martin: How did I come to it, think about MindMeister before I was doing some memory training and I was thinking about: “Okay, what type of cool business application could I start? And then I came to MindMeister and it looked very, very simple and easy to me. So now, the question is: What are the reasons you keep out competitors out of the way? What is the secret sauce? Is it the scale, is it the simplicity, is it just because you’re somehow market leader in this kind of segment already?Michael: I think all of it placed together a little bit. We were the first to launch but not by a lot. Actually, I think about two months after we launched, the first competitor came along with you know, quite a similar solution, he was techn ically different, it was actually flash-phase back then, the competitor. It was the same browser-based mind-mapping.Yes, the thing is that definitely something we always prowess one of our USPs is simplicity â€" the focus on usability, on simplicity, on a beautiful design that we try and update regularly and keep fresh and keep modern, also again try and focus on a simple user interface that doesn’t overload the user, that keeps the learning curve quick and steep and that’s what we still do with that product with all the other products as well. At least I believe it’s one of the keys to success for all kinds of apps.Martin: And when this competitor arose like two months after you’ve launched, what had been your thought or reactions to that?Michael: Desperation, initially. In the first few years, whenever a new competitor came along, we would be quite depressed and think: “Oh god, what if they do it so much better than we do?”, “What if, they take our market away?” It hasn’t happened fortunately. If you stay on the ball, if you keep pleasing the users, keep making your app better, keep providing it with service, it’s unlikely to happen, unless Facebook or whoever decided to enter your niche. It hasn’t happened and we learned to live with it much better. So these days when we see a new app, we’re like: “Right, okay, so yup, looks good but we’ve come a long way and I think they will have to come a long way as well.Martin: Can you elaborate a little bit on the current team set-up and what is actually your focus? Are you seeing yourself more like a, let’s say, marketing customer acquisition company or are you perceiving yourself more as a tech company or maybe something totally different?Michael: I think we would like to perceive ourselves as a marketing growth customer acquisition company but if we’re being honest, we’re a tech company. That’s not a bad thing in itself either. My co-founder, Till and I were both techies from our background, we’re still techies at heart, I think. Although in the last years we focused much, much more on things like marketing, growth and even finance â€" all these things, you have to obviously do if you run a company. So we do that much, much more with built teams there to do that, but in the end of the day, after everything, I think it’s the product that counts. You have to have a great product, you have to provide a great service, you can increase your success obviously with marketing but I think no amount of amazing marketing could turn a dot into a gold nugget.Martin: And how many free users that you need to acquire so you c ould become cash flow-neutral at least after many months?Michael: I think as we had about a hundred thousand users or something in free users in total that, I think, that that wasn’t breakeven yet. But I think it was between a hundred thousand and three hundred thousand, somewhere there we had a monthly recurring revenue that helped us pay the c osts, running costs of the company. Well, we were only free people back then, still it wasn’t a huge running cost. But like I said, we focused a lot on getting many users so the conversion rate wasn’t amazing to paid users so we needed quite a lot of free users to actually pay the costs, but it grew quite quickly.Martin: Good. And at what point of time did you think about adding another product and creating, let’s say, an overall brand like MeisterLabs?Michael: Early on, about three years ago I would say. So we launched it nine months ago, we took our time building the second product; we wanted to make it really good. It took about two years actually. But we saw a few things:First of all we saw: mind-mapping is a stage in a process and it’s usually the first stage in a project. Three years heavily in the start phase of a project, when you exchange ideas, when you brainstorm, when you map out your project, and then comes a point when you go into implementing the project and w orking on everything. Then you need a different tool, and we saw a lot of users dropping off, of MindMeister maybe coming back a couple of months later for the next project but actually dropping off. We said, “Okay, let’s, you know, it’s a shame that they have to move to another tool because we don’t provide anything for them.”So we thought: “Okay, that would be a nice point to offer them a product that’s integrated with MindMeister and supports them in that second phase of the project.” We thought there’s lots of task mission tools around, of course it’s a huge market, it’s a very important market and we thought we have a lot of ideas that could make it nice, make it very usable, very simple, combine some of the things we like in other tools and create something we hope users will like.Martin: Why did it take you two years to develop this prototype? And second question would be, lots of start-ups have the belief that: “Let’s ship it early, get the customer feedback and then iterate on the live product” which apparently you did not do.Michael: Exactly, yes. I have to say, looking back I’m very happy with the result, it is one thing. We took our time, we took a long time, we went through many iterations of design and so on and when we shipped, it was a really, really good product. But, looking back, I think we should have probably come the other way, we should have done it quicker, come up with something quicker, got feedback faster. That’s what we’ll probably try to do working in the next product. That is a lesson learned, I would say. Although again, I couldn’t say if the result would be the same. You know, looking back now you don’t know what would’ve happened if you went the other way. Taking too long with a product has a lot of drawbacks apart from the fact that you know, we came up later, we did. You know, you have to keep your team motivated and developers as well, if you take too long to bring out something, obvio usly the market moves. So my take away from that experience was next time spend more time on a smaller initial prototype and try to ship it faster.Martin: When you started with the company, you had a very limited scope of what you wanted to achieve, like for example with MindMeister, and then adding further products. For me, the question is what is the bigger vision which combines those different product ideas?Michael: Well, the bigger vision is to cover the entire creative process inside a high-tech company, so to speak, because that’s our target market, our main target market. The creative process, I mean creative project that starts out with a brainstorming bit, product development bit, and some sort of marketing campaign bit, anything else. Right now we cover the first two phases, the brainstorming phase and the actual project carrying out. There is a missing piece at the end, there we have some ideas for that as it is one missing piece in there and we might come out with it w ith a product that covers something there and closes the circle to the next project.Martin: How are those products integrated? So, for example I look at MindMeister, how is it then integrated to MeisterTask?Michael: When you’re in MindMeister, you can switch on MeisterTask toolbar and you can connect each mind-map with a project, so to speak. And if it’s not connected you can just right from there, create a project for this mind-map, although I’ve made a mind-map that’s connected with the same project and all that. So, let’s say kind of a one-to-many relationship there. And then in the toolbar you’ll see all the people that are in your project. You see little avatars from photos of them, and you can very easily just drag any mind-map node, any topic onto one of those avatars and what it’ll do, it’ll create a task for that person in the project.We, for example, we a lot our weekly meetings, and in weekly meetings we mind-map all the things we go through and then, with that okay, so that’s actually that’s something that, you know, Andrei has to do. So, we make the task and we drag it onto his face and he has the task assigned and the project management system and he can start working on it after the meeting.Martin: What’s the idea of MeisterTask based on several customer requests or was it more of a vision of you both that you said: “Oh, it would be very interesting if we are working on this creative process and therefore the next logical step would be this although customers didn’t request it.”?Michael: We had many customer requests to enhance the task management functionality in MindMeister. In fact, there’s a little bit of a task management functionality there like all mind-mapping tools, they allow you to sign a priority onto a node and the person and due date. But it’s very, very lightweight, so it has no follow-through, no process behind it. It is also very little, in terms of task functionality.Customers wanted more there. So it was visible customers used it for task management as well but we didn’t want to blow up a, sort of, partial functionality of a mind-mapping tool and then make it into a mind-mapping tool more complex, more low fit. We thought: Okay, since this is something different what people do, then this should be done in a dedicated tool.Martin: One option would have been if Im having this kind of modular market where I’m having mind-maps and I perceive you as a clear market leader in that. And now you’re entering into another market which is more task related etc. So, did you receive some kind of reaction from the other task-related companies that were just adding mind-mapping functionality, and then the competitions in those two markets are even increasing?Michael: We haven’t seen that yet as such. I think it terms of market size the mind-mapping market is a very focused but still very niche market. Usually when companies are in a market of a certain size, they expand into bigge r, adjacent markets. They usually don’t expand so much into smaller adjacent markets. So we haven’t seen many task management tools expanding into mind-mapping. We see quite a few of our mind-mapping competitors adding task management but they usually do it differently, they add some more functionality into their product.ADVICE TO ENTREPRENEURS FROM MICHAEL HOLLAUFMartin: So Michael, over the last let’s say ten to thirteen years, what have been the major learnings that you can share with other people starting a company? Like some the stupid mistakes an entrepreneur can do, or maybe some very cool things he should do?Michael: Well, that could potentially be quite long. People interested in the story, there’s this article on TechCrunch that kind of tells our story, in quite details.Whenever I talk about the learnings from 7, 8, 9 years ago, I always mention the fact that this was 7, 8, 9 years ago and that also the market, the internet market, SaaS market has moved a lot since then. So, when I talk about the way we launched with a private beta, had invited people, gave them invitations, that’s something that worked back then. Quite uncertain whether it would work as well now because many people have done it and the market has changed and you need to shout much louder these days to get their attention than you used to so many years ago.But I think some of the other learnings are still quite valid for example: the other one I mentioned is focus on making your product usable, focus on the user, try to give him a nice feeling when he uses it. That is one key to success that we’d had, modest as it may be compared to some other companies out there of course. But I still believe that that’s one of the big things and we are not ready to compromise on usability doing anything. So we will discuss any small user interface change in the name UI for a very long time to make sure that it doesn’t make things more complex or scare users off. So that is something we are good at.Some of the things that we’ve learnt over the years that we weren’t so good at, we also learned that they were important, have to do with obviously with marketing, with analytics especially. So analytics is one of the things that everyone knows is hugely important. In terms of measure, how your tool is used, measure what your users do, measure the conversions, all your key metrics, beware of key metrics. But I think at the same time, everyone who knows how important it is, very few actually know the numbers very well or do enough on that side. And that’s something that becomes more difficult to do the more you grow. So, if you start up with a small tool, and you build all the analytics and your measurements right in the beginning that’s much easier than if you do it years later when you have quite a large tool.Martin: You said that analytics is very important. In the beginning, you didn’t know how your valid proposition and business model will look like bec ause you’re iterating, etc. Do you think it’s a very good idea to have analytics from day one although you do not know what it is because it costs money to set up analytics, analyze etc, etc? Or do you think even though you should be very agile and iterative, still analytics should be done on day one?Michael: Yes, I think it should be. Like I said, it’s very easy to build it into a small product and I don’t think there’s any real cost associated with it if you don’t have a lot of traffic yet. Most of the tools that are out there will let you use it for free up to I don’t know how many thousands of impressions per day or logs per day. Once you grow, it’ll cost money but then you could hopefully afford it. It just helps you know your business, it helps you to keep things simple because if you measure everything you will also not run the risk of building too complex work flows into your tool, billing flows, conversion flows, and sign-up flows because it’s hard to meas ure them.The other thing we’ve learned, we’ve had quite a difficult set-up of ­ ­in terms of 30-day-free-trial with or without the credit card. And we actually went back and made everything much, much simpler. First of all, it is better for the user, easier to understand for the user, and second, because it’s much easier to measure.Martin: What tools can you recommend for analytics?Michael: So, we are using a mixture at the moment. One of the tools is everyone talks about is quite good, really, it’s Amplitude as it lets you log real, granular user events inside your app and see what users do, look at funnels about what they’re doing in the app. We still use Google Analytics for main SEO things.There is a couple of other SEO tools, on-page optimization tools and so on that are out there but there’s really too many to make any clear recommendation. We use on-page, we use search metrics, we use a few of those but take your pick. Something is better in each of the tools but overall, as long as you use something, that’s good enough.Martin: And when you wake up in the morning, what are the 3 to 5 key metrics you are totally interested about in order to assess whether your business is running well or not?Michael: When I wake up in the morning I usually unfortunately think of the tech things. I should think about those key metrics more. But some of the things we’re deeply looking at are, with intention, something we’re looking into very much in MindMeister. So, we look at different things in different products. In MindMeister retention is our focus and that’s because, like I mentioned before, it’s a bit of a seasonal product â€" you use it when you start a project, and you map it out, you create a couple of mind maps, share them with friends. Then when you fund that, you go away maybe for a long time and maybe come back. So our goal with that tool is build it into the usual work lifes of people more like we use it on an on-going basis and there we focus on retention. We have a lot of new users and we have four to five thousand new users per day, still growing, it’s pretty amazing. It’s important to show the people what they can do with the tool and keep them as users.With MeisterTask, it’s different. MeisterTask is a much more techy product once you use it because once you had a project there, once you had a task in there, unless you manage to finish them all, you will continue to use it, you know, you can continue to make more tasks, continue to share it with people. There, for us it’s more important to show people this is here as well, so this is an alternative if you’re using, let’s say, Asana, Wunderlist, or Trello, have a look at this because we think it’s better for these and these reasons. Most of the people who’ve seen it have agreed and the challenge there is how to get in front of those people.Martin: Great. Michael, what other learnings did you perceive over the years?Michael: So one other thing we’ve seen is it’s also been the way we’ve developed the second product, MeisterTask. If you had a problem and you don’t find a solution out there or you don’t find that you like and you then build a product to solve that problem for you then it’s quite likely, very likely so to speak, that there will be others out there, probably many others who had have that same problem and for whom you will help solve the problem with your product, so to speak. We did this with MeisterTask, we had this problem ourselves, how do we do our tasks after we’ve the mind-mapping. We built something that we wanted to use that helps us in our product development in our company, helps not only the tech team but also helps the marketing team and the sales team to manage their projects. So, we looked at companies our type, our size with different departments that would like to use an all-in-one tool together and built it for that. And we looked at the second characteristic as well there, we lo oked at companies â€" small companies like ours that work with freelancers, we have an external designer, we have an external iOS, Android developers and so on. And so we built the tools so that it also works for those people. You can write there, they have access to it, they don’t have to use only that and you can look at this use case and when we launched it had seemed that we weren’t the only ones who had that problem. So I think, build something for yourself that you really happy with and others will follow, so to speak.Martin: Great. Michael, thank you so much for sharing your insights and if you’re looking for a great task manager, check out MeisterTask. Thanks!Michael: Pleasure.THANKS FOR LISTENING!Thanks so much for joining our fifth podcast episode!Have some feedback you’d like to share?  Leave  a note in the comment section below! If you enjoyed this episode, please  share  it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of the post.Also,  please leave an h onest review for The Cleverism Podcast on iTunes or on SoundCloud. Ratings and reviews  are  extremely  helpful  and greatly appreciated! They do matter in the rankings of the show, and we read each and every one of them.Special thanks  to Michael for joining me this week. Until  next time!

Friday, May 22, 2020

The Music Of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - 991 Words

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was an Austrian composer who mastered the range of contemporary modern instrumental and vocal forms—including the symphony, concerto, chamber music, and especially in the opera. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born on January 27, 1756, in Salzburg, Austria. Mozart mom and dad, stressed about the importance music to their children. Wolfgang received in-depth musical training that by the age of six he was a rising composer and a soon to be keyboard performer. In 1762 Mozart dad presented him as a performer at the imperial court in Vienna, Austria, and from 1763 to 1766 he lead both of his children on a continuous musical tour across. Mozart was the most praised child prodigy of this time as a keyboard performer. He also made a great impression as a composer. In London he won the admiration of musician Johann Christian Bach and he was exposed from an early age to different variety of musical styles across Europe. Although he had great musical ability, Mozart’s lack of a normal childhood caused him much suffering. During his youth, Mozart was constantly in the news and was extravagantly acclaimed by all. He was well aware of his precious talent and developed an arrogant and overly confident demeanor. He had little discipline and maturity outside the subject of music. Mozart frequently went through periods of financial difficulty. At age 4 Wolfgang himself began keyboard lessons playing without fault and with great sensitivity, and by age 5 he wasShow MoreRelatedMusic From Mozart s 1st Movement, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart ( 1788 )1405 Words   |  6 PagesK.545 Sonata 1st Movement, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1788), Classical The K.545 Sonata is probably my favorite piece of music from Mozart’s sonatas. Mozart had such great musicality when playing the piano. He had a structure in mind when composing the song since he has an exposition, development and recapitulation The piano sonata is also known as the piano facile however there are three movements to the entire piece as would any typical sonata. I like the sound and the way the notes flow. The firstRead More Life Of Mozart Essay670 Words   |  3 PagesThe Life of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-91) is regarded as the greatest composer who ever lived. He began writing minuets at the age of 5,and by the time he died in 1791 at the age of 35, he had produced 626 cataloged works. â€Å" Mozart has enriched the concerto form with a larger number of masterpieces than any other composer.†1 nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is said to be the greatest genius in western music history. WolfgangRead MoreSummary : Mozart 1016 Words   |  5 PagesJohannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart Lydia Molina Mr. Dresser General Music 27 May, 2015 Mozart Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart, known for his string of operas, concertos, symphonies and sonatas, he helped shape classical music as it is today. â€Å"Born on January 27, 1756, in Salzburg, Austria, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was a musician capable of playing many instruments at age six. Over the years, Mozart aligned himself with a variety of EuropeanRead MoreThe History And Transitions Of Music933 Words   |  4 Pageshistory and transitions of music has had many talented persons that have influenced music but none are so well known as Franz Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Ludwig van Beethoven. All three of these great composers performed during the Classic period and it would act as the base of classic music for the next one hundred and fifty, to two hundred years. The names of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven are so well known that people who have little to no knowledge of music will recognize their namesRead MoreJennifer Persaud. Professor Adams . Musi c 101. April 2017.1148 Words   |  5 PagesProfessor Adams Music 101 April 2017 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Johann Chrysostom Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born in 1756 and died in 1791. Shortly after his birth in Salzburg, Austria, he was baptized as Joannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart however, he just went by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. As aforementioned, his baptism refers to the religious rite of a person that belongs to a Christian Church. His mother, Anna Maria Mozart and his fatherRead MoreThe Classical Music Genre1271 Words   |  6 PagesThere are numerous composers within the Classical Music genre; each one is different from the next. Although it may seem that each piece of music within the Classical genre is the same, they are just as different as the composers are to one another. Wolfgang Mozart is a very well known composer. He was not only popular in the time period in which he lived, but he continues to be one of the better known composers in today’s society. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born on January 27, 1756, in Salzburg, AustriaRead More Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Essay1202 Words   |  5 PagesWolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, as he is generally known, was baptized in a Salzburg Cathedral on the day after his birth as Joannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus. The first and last given names come from his godfather Joannes Theophilus Pergmayr, although Mozart preferred the Latin form of this last name, Amadeus, more often Amadà ©, or the Italiano Amadeo, and occasionally the Deutsch Gottlieb. Whatever the case may be, he rarely - if ever - used Theophilus in his signatureRead MoreThe Classical Era Of Music1012 Words   |  5 Pagesforms of music were created. The Classical era expanded from 1770 to 1820, and during that time many great composers rose including Franz Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and Ludwig Van Beethoven. A very important composer whose music is still heard today is Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. His fame and great works in music changed throughout his childhood, middle age, and his final years. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born in Salzburg, Austria January 27, 1756. His father Leopold Mozart was a violinistRead MoreWolfgang Amadeus Mozarts Impact On Classical Music1221 Words   |  5 Pageshear or think of classical music, what do you think of? What should come to your mind is someone by the name of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who is best known as just Mozart, had a huge impact on classical music and truly changed the style forever. He had a remarkable young childhood, but then went through some up and downs as he got older. Mozart was best known by his personal life, career, and music. Mozart’s personal life was full of music. He was born on January 27Read More wolfgang amadeus mozart Essay1190 Words   |  5 Pages Mozart was considered to be the best musician/composer of all time. Mozart was a genius when it came music and composing, he was said that no other could rival him and to this day people still say that he is the best. The reason why I choose to do Mozart is the fact I do believe he is the best musician/composer of all time, and his life story is of a tragic but gifted young soul. Later on you will find out about his family, his teachings, his tragedies, and of course his accomplishments. Wolfgang

Thursday, May 7, 2020

Dash Gourmet Business Plan - 2830 Words

The Dash Gourmet A unique solution for your dining experience Business Plan July 16, 2007 Presented By: Ben Blum Rahul Kapasi Candice Lalor Elyssa McMullen Brian Reppert Suresh Selvarangan Jeff Tierney Executive Summary Dash Gourmet is a quick service deli on the cutting edge of technology, designed to serve a clientele consisting of busy corporate employees looking for a quick, yet healthy, dining experience. Dash Gourmet will feature traditional deli food: sandwiches, salads, etc., but will utilize unique technology designed to enhance and accelerate the customers’ dining experience. Each customer will be able to place their order themselves, either ahead of time on the internet or via a self service touchpad†¦show more content†¦Additionally, these locations could serve as secondary locations for future restaurant expansion. The restaurant will feature dining room seating for approximately 15 tables and will be equipped to serve up to 50 take-out customers per hour during peak lunchtime hours. Market Analysis Summary Market Segmentation The 2000 Census indicates that there are about 116,000 people living in the Edison/Woodbridge Area. Additionally, there are 1,305 corporate businesses in the area, employing about 16,000 employees between them. Target Market Segment Strategy Although the target market demographic for quick service restaurants is fairly broad, and The Dash Gourmet will capitalize on the overall market, the main target demographic that we are aiming to serve is the technologically savvy and busy corporate employee who is concerned with eating quickly and in a healthy manner. Market Needs Currently there are no sit down restaurants that utilize self-service ordering. The Dash Gourmet would be the first establishment to fill this need, which would be essential for the target demographic that we are serving, the computer-savvy corporate customer who cannot afford to spend too much time preparing lunch. Market Trends There are several favorable market trends in the Metro Park area including, a growing number of corporate entitiesShow MoreRelatedAssessment of Products and Services of Starbucks Coffee1385 Words   |  6 PagesCoffee is hot and cool. No longer just a commodity and a clichà ©, coffee-based specialty drinks are achieving new glamour status as the beverage of choice among the young and the hip. Gourmet coffee is becoming more of an away-from-home phenomenon. While bean retailers and roaster retailers once dominated the sale of gourmet coffee, beverage bars are now outstripping them as the most important outlet for distribution of specialty coffee, according to figures from the Specialty Coffee Association of AmericaRead MoreNature Brothers2268 Words   |  10 Pagesthe day that Dale Morris remembers as the â€Å"public debut† of his creation, a new seasoned salt mix. Although he was a salesman by temperament and career, his hobby was cooking. Having experimented with both traditional home cooking and more exotic gourmet cooking, Morris had developed an appreciation for many herbs and spices. He had also done a lot of reading about the health hazards of the typical American diet. When his mother learned that she had high blood pressure, Morris decided it was timeRead MoreMartha Stewart s Reputation Of Being A Successful Entrepreneur1758 Words   |  8 PagesStewart began working as a stockbroker on Wall Street. She worked as a stockbroker until 1972. In the late 70’s she finally started what she is best known for today, cooking and house keeping. She first opened up her own store which consisted of gourmet food and catering. This helped her write her first book, which became a huge success. Martha Stewart worked her way up to celebrity status by starting her company Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, previously known as Martha Stewart, Inc., which quicklyRead MoreCoffee Shop Draft Proposal5306 Words   |  22 Pagesconcern: MARKETING ASPECT 1. Who will be the possible costumers? 2. What is the potential target of the coffee shop business? 3. What marketing strategy should be adopted in order to assure the success of the business? 4. What is the present demand and supply situation for the project and prosperity for the future? 5. What is the primary target market of the business? OPERATIONAL ASPECT 1. What are the machines and equipment’s that will be needed for the operation? 2. Where willRead MoreFeasibility Study Chapter 1-318936 Words   |  76 Pagesoffered? What are the strengths, weaknesses, threats and opportunities present in establishing a business? Who is the target market of the said business? Technical Aspect How can the waste disposal be managed? Where will the business be located? What machineries and equipment are needed for the business? What are the products to be offered? Financial Aspect How much capital is needed to put up the business? Where will the capital come from? How shall the required capitalization be raised? How longRead MoreFundamentals of Hrm263904 Words   |  1056 PagesDEVELOPMENT Socializing, Orienting, and Developing Employees 182 Managing Careers 208 PART 5 Chapter 10 Chapter 11 Chapter 12 Chapter 13 MAINTAINING HIGH PERFORMANCE Establishing the Performance Management System 230 Establishing Rewards and Pay Plans 260 Employee Benefits 286 Ensuring a Safe and Healthy Work Environment 312 PART 6 Chapter 14 LABOR–MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTS Understanding Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining 340 Endnotes 367 Glossary 389 Company Index 395 Subject Index

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Fantasy and Poetry in Children’s Literature Free Essays

The two selections of literature are Cinderella for the fantasy story and a poem by Eloise Greenfield called â€Å"Tradition†. Both selections are from different cultural traditions, but portray positive messages to children and adults in today’s society. Every little girl dreams of finding her prince charming. We will write a custom essay sample on Fantasy and Poetry in Children’s Literature or any similar topic only for you Order Now There are more than 1500 different versions of â€Å"Cinderella† from cultures all over the world. The story of Cinderella has been in existence since 1865 and published by George Routledge. This fairy tale is one of the oldest and most familiar to young children that inspire them to believe anything is possible. The literary elements in Cinderella include the setting, characters, plot, conflict, climax, and ending. The setting was in a faraway kingdom a long time ago. The characters included a young girl name Cinderella, her stepmother, two stepsisters, the prince, and fairy godmother. The Plot of this fairy tale is a young girl who is being treated unfairly, but dreams of finding her true love. She is being mistreated by her stepmom and sisters and works as a maid in the home. Cinderella begs to go to a ball and is told she could go after all chores are completed. Once she completes the chores and finds a dress, she is maliciously attacked by her stepsisters and destroys her dress. Cinderella was shattered and thought she would never recover from this. The conflict in this story is the continual dislike from the stepmother and stepsisters against Cinderella. The climax is so exciting in this story. After Cinderella meets her fairy godmother, she dresses her in a beautiful gown and sends her to the ball, Cinderella forgets about the time and at 12:00 midnight her fantasy is over. She runs out of the ball and leaves her glass slipper. The prince is searching all over the kingdom searching for the girl who could fit the glass slipper. The ending to this fairy tale is every girl’s dream. The prince searched high and low searching for his princess. He sent his grand Duke to try the glass slipper on every girl in the kingdom and the shoe only fits one person. After Cinderella revealed she had the other glass slipper. This created one of the most romantic fairy tales ever. Cinderella and the Prince falls in love, marry, and live happily ever after. â€Å"Tradition† is a poem written by Eloise Greenfield, an Africa American poet in 1988. Eloise was born in 1929 in North Carolina; this was in the early days of the Great Depression. Eloise was influenced by memories of her childhood, observations, and stories she had read about. The literary elements in the poem include the setting, characters, plot, conflict, climax, and ending. The setting in this poem was a long time ago in a southern state. The character in this poem is any person who has worked hard throughout his or her lives with no worry of failure or fear. The plot in the poem is to live, learn, and give back to others. The conflict in this poem is dealing with self. She can achieve anything in life if she works hard and want it bad enough. The climax is rising to the occasion. If she is able to overcome adversity and focus on her goals, regardless of the many things you have been through. Success is the end of this poem. How to cite Fantasy and Poetry in Children’s Literature, Papers

Monday, April 27, 2020

Snapchats Updates Causing Controversy Essays -

Dr. Cottrill ENG-101 25 March 2015 Snapchats Updates Causing Controversy The New Snapchat Update is rapidly rising as the #1 most used app. It has caused a rave amongst all its users this year. Snap Chat developers have changed on what we expect on mobile apps. It has built so much popularity with teenagers and young adults, most are saying its the hottest Social networking tool since the release of big time apps like Twitter in 2008. Snapchat has given all media publishers a new standard to go by. I say this because, most apps and social networks dont have or arent capable of what Snap Chat is able to now do. They have risen the bar. Some might even say set new expectations if you will. How, you ask? They did it with great innovation and smart business moves causing Snap Chat to bring in some helpful, pass the time additions to their application. These 5 updates were added to Snap Chat in the past two months and could possibly make Snap Chat the #1 used app after a while. The first update they did was the addition of Discover. The Discover slide is a daily update with a select few of the most popular TV network channels. TV network channels such as VICE, CNN, ESPN, People, Warners Music, Food Network, and much more. This quickly became popular to everyone who uses Snap Chat or watches those TV channels. With this, snapchat has brought so much meaning to the term App in such short time. It amazes me how innovative and efficient this app is becoming while other apps are at a standstill. Apparently, Im not the only one who is impressed with Snapchat. Discovers user interface is devilishly clever. Just open the menu, pick one of twelve channels, and browse animated story teasers from that channel The next day, you get an entirely different set of stories. Its a good medium for browsing while youre on the bus, in the bathroom, or waiting for someone at a restaurant. And, at least for now, the channels are putting a lot of effort into making their stories v isually appealing. Most post five or so stories per day, though Ive seen as many as fifteen. (Roose par. 5). Snap Chat knows America is constantly on the go. People are always ripping and running now a days. No one has time to sit down and watch their favorite TV channels anymore. So, Snap Chat has found a way to advance their #1 used app campaign by giving the busy people of America a way to stay updated and in the know with their favorite TV network channels. Im not talking like all reports or something either. They also provide you with daily videos that load instantly. Which if you ask me is perfect for people who dont have time to go out their way to view something that they might actually want to see. Im a witness to this update making my life that much better by being there when I needed it. Its so handy and convenient that its hard not to always use this app. I mean yea, on twitter you got videos now and you can follow your favorite TV channels pages but they dont show daily updated videos every single day like Snap Chat does. Even then Instagram isnt showing you daily updates. Instagram would show you more of a weekly update. Useless really, unless you not big on keeping up with society. Someone like me who is constantly busy and has something to do appreciates a daily update on 11 TV network channels that are so easy to access. Im always looking for a daily news update on whats going on in the world. I just have to be in the know of things. Also, with the variety of channels to choose from, snapchat appeals to such a broad audience of people who watch those TV channels, but also have jobs. I remember when I first got this update I was in the food hall sitting down talking to some friends. When I was shown by another friend who updated before me I couldnt believe it. Every teen in that food hall was

Thursday, March 19, 2020

A Minor essays

A Minor essays Every citizen in Canada is guaranteed specific democratic and legal rights which are set out in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. However, in the case of Bethany Hughes, a sixteen-year old girl who refused blood transfusions due to certain religious beliefs, and then was given dozens of blood transfusions against her will, it would seem that some of these rights were taken away from her because she was a minor. Such a controversial issue is multi-dimensional; one must consider many aspects of the case such as the governments will in its doing, precedent or similar cases, and which specific rights and freedoms were being violated, if any. Because Bethany was a Jehovahs Witness, she refused the blood transfusions in adherence to her faith and religious beliefs (Christians believe the Bible says people should not accept others blood into their bodies). The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms states in section 2(a) that every citizen of Canada has freedom of conscience and religion. Bethany refused the blood transfusions because that is what she believed as a Jehovahs Witness. In the article, it says that Bethany was given the transfusions anyway because a panel of judges agreed that even though Bethany was considered a mature minor she couldnt make the medical decision on her own because she had been extremely influenced by fellow Jehovahs Witnesses. Regardless of any persuasion by her fellow believers, which the judges had no real proof of anyways, Bethany Hughes decision to not have the transfusions should have been respected based on the direct violation of section 2(b) of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Be thany has the right to freedom of conscience and religion, as set out in the Charter, as a citizen of Canada, minor or not. The same argument applies to section 2(c) of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms which states that every citiz...

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

Understanding Chemical Evolution

Understanding Chemical Evolution The term chemical evolution can be used in many different ways depending on the context of the words. If you are speaking to an astronomer, then it could be a discussion about how new elements are formed during supernovas. Chemists may believe chemical evolution pertains to how oxygen or hydrogen gases evolve out of some types of chemical reactions. In evolutionary biology, on the other hand, the term chemical evolution most often is used to describe the hypothesis that organic building blocks of life were created when inorganic molecules came together. Sometimes called abiogenesis, chemical evolution could be how life started on Earth. The Earths environment when it was first formed was very different than it is now. The Earth was somewhat hostile to life and so the creation of life on Earth did not come for billions of years after the Earth was first formed. Because of its ideal distance from the sun, the Earth is the only planet in our solar system that is capable of having liquid water in the orbits the planets are in now. This was the first step in chemical evolution to create life on Earth. The early Earth also did not have an atmosphere surrounding it to block ultraviolet rays which can be deadly to the cells that make up all life. Eventually, scientists believe a primitive atmosphere full of greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide and perhaps some methane and ammonia, but no oxygen. This became important later in the evolution of life on Earth as photosynthetic and chemosynthetic organisms used these substances to create energy. So just how did abiogenesis or chemical evolution happen? No one is completely certain, but there are many hypotheses. It is true that the only way new atoms of non-synthetic elements can be made are through the supernovas of extremely large stars. All other atoms of elements are recycled through various biogeochemical cycles. So either the elements were already on Earth when it was formed (presumably from the collection of space dust around an iron core), or they came to Earth via the continuous meteor strikes that were common before the protective atmosphere was formed. Once the inorganic elements were on Earth, most hypotheses agree that the chemical evolution of the organic building blocks of life began in the oceans. The majority of Earth is covered by the oceans. It is not a stretch to think that the inorganic molecules that would undergo chemical evolution would be floating around in the oceans. The question remains just how these chemicals evolved to become organic building blocks of life. This is where the different hypotheses branch off from each other. One of the more popular hypotheses says that the organic molecules were created by chance as the inorganic elements collided and bonded in the oceans. However, this is always met with resistance because statistically the chance of this happening is very small. Others have tried to recreate the conditions of early Earth and make organic molecules. One such experiment, commonly called the Primordial Soup experiment, was successful in creating the organic molecules out of inorganic elements in a lab setting. However, as we learn more about the ancient Earth, we have found out that not all of the molecules they used were actually around during that time. The search continues to learn more about chemical evolution and how it could have begun life on Earth. New discoveries are made on a regular basis that help scientists understand what was available and how things may have happened in this process. Hopefully one day scientists will be able to pinpoint how chemical evolution happened and a clearer picture of how life began on Earth will emerge.